10 everyday words we got from science fiction writers

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American sci-fi writer, Theodore Sturgeon famously said, “Sure, ninety percent of science fiction is crud.” He believed that was “because ninety percent of everything is crud”, but many literary purists think sci-fi’s exotic worlds, flamboyant characters and incredibly imaginative plots make it throwaway. Yet, if they delved a bit deeper, they’d find a profound genre that’s both rich in themes and perhaps, more surprisingly, in language too. In fact, over the years it’s given us a myriad of new words, the majority of which have been created in order to describe concepts and devices that didn’t have existing words in their time. Most of these words have never been incorporated into our everyday language. However, sometimes technology catches up to sci-fi and a fictional word gets borrowed and becomes a common term. In other situations, a sci-fi author doesn’t necessarily coin a word, but uses it and popularizes it, keeping it alive and in use.

So, ready yourself for blast off as we count down 10 of our favorite out-of-this-world words and phrases from science fiction that have become part of our everyday lives.

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Femtastic Lit: History’s 10 greatest sci-fi novels written by women

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Despite the fact that women have helped shape science fiction from the beginning, female-penned novels are often mysteriously absent from the “Best-of” lists. There are many people that believe that women don’t (or even worse, can’t) write science fiction–which simply isn’t true. With this list, we celebrate some of the most influential and noteworthy sci-fi novels written by women.
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The 13 greatest opening lines from novels of the 1960s

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Publishers sometimes say that getting someone to pick up a novel is half the battle won. But once that book is held in the palm of a potential reader’s hand, it’s up to the first line to grab their attention and never let it go. Arguably, (other than maybe the closing line), there’s no sentence more important than the opening line. A book, of course, won’t stand or fall on the very first line of prose, but a really good opening tells the reader what to expect in terms of language, plot and character. It should be compelling, mysterious, poetic or shocking. It should make the reader want to immediately sit down in the middle of the aisle and carry on reading.

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